Monday, December 8, 2008

One Hundred Years of Jamaica Plain Architecture

I did a photographic survey of the older houses in Jamaica Plain this year, and I've been looking for something to do with them. Here, I've decided to show the oldest houses with dates taken mostly from the Landmark Commission survey of Jamaica Plain buildings. This is not a comprehensive survey, but a "most information with the least effort" listing. The dates for many houses show a range; for example, "between 1858-1874." The dating was done with maps and directories, so in this case the house doesn't show up in an 1858 directory, but does in an 1874 map. Deeds tell when land was purchased, but not when houses were built, so getting exact dates is impossible in many, if not most cases. The dates come mostly from the Landmark Commission survey of Jamaica Plain buildings that was done in the 1980s - I'll post the reference soon. I've put them in approximate order, with a cutoff of about 1874. Why 1874? It includes all the oldest houses, and leaves the Queen Anne houses for another time. I will be adding houses as I find the time and the energy. The main intent is to allow you to scroll down the page and see how house styles changed over time. Enjoy.

Note: You can see these and many more pictures of pre-20th Century Jamaica Plain houses at the J.P. Historical Society web site here.




Loring-Greenough House - 1760




1085 Centre street - by 1796



526 Centre street - by 1806



812-814 Centre street - between 1802-1810



1090 Centre street - 1820s


48 Goldsmith street - probably pre-1830; moved from another location.


52 Eliot street - 1822-1843.


50 Eliot street - between 1822-1843.



991 Centre street - by 1832, possibly 18th century.




1011 Centre street - by 1832.



1 Dane street - 1833-1834.



800 Centre street - by 1847


45R Green street - around 1842.



33-35 Green street - 1840-41.



47 Eliot street - by 1843.


305 Chestnut avenue - 1844-48.




63 May street - 1840s.


5 Eliot place - between 1843-1854.


20 Seaverns avenue - 1845-1846.



18 Seaverns avenue - 1845-1846.



14 Seaverns avenue - 1840-1845.




28 Lakeville, between 1842-1845.


317 Lamartine street - between 1843-1858.



28 Cheshire street - between 1849-58.



242 Pond street - between 1849-1859.


85 May street - between 1848-1859.


27 Eliot street - around 1850.



146 Forest Hills street - 1852.


11 Harris avenue - 1850s.


83 Elm street - 1854-55.



9 Harris avenue - between 1850-1858.



16-18 Harris avenue - 1852-1859.



1-2 Greenough park - front, 1856; back, later addition.



793 Centre street - 1854-59




252 Chestnut avenue - probably by 1858.



6 Marlou terrace - by 1858.



11 Newsome park - by 1859.




195 Chestnut avenue - 1858-59.




268 Chestnut avenue - probably by 1858; by 1866.



253 Lamartine street - between 1858-1871.



17 St John street - between 1849-1856.



101 McBride street - around 1864.


7 Revere street - 1865-1866.



233 Chestnut avenue - possibly by 1867; by 1871




41 Clive street - between 1866-1877.


223 Chestnut avenue - by 1868.



244 Chestnut avenue - probably by 1865; by 1871.



61 Pond street - between 1859-1874.




9 Myrtle street - 1859-1863.



8 Myrtle street - 1859-1863.



22 Orchard street - between 1859-1874.



57 Orchard street - between 1859-1874.




45 Orchard street - betwen 1859-1874.





21 Myrtle street - 1859-1874.




18 Myrtle street - 1859-1874.




11 Myrtle street - 1859-1874.



180 Moss Hill road - 1855-1874.




85 McBride street - 1866-1874.


88 Seaverns avenue - around 1870


84 Seaverns avenue - around 1870.




90 Seaverns avenue - around 1870.





73 Elm street - around 1875.


5 Eliot street - between 1859-1874.



28 Eliot street - between 1874-1884.



7 Eliot place - by 1875.


15 Custer street - between 1859-1874



145 Chestnut avenue - by 1872.



803 Centre street - between 1871-74



271-273 Chestnut avenue - by 1874.

15 comments:

  1. This is a fabulous photo essay! And the funny thing is, all of my favorite JP houses -- many of which are pictured here -- are the oldest. And I don't even know the dates they were built!

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  2. There are some beautiful mansard houses from the early 1870s that didn't get in just because it was getting too big and the page will take too long to load for some people. Maybe I'll make the pics a little smaller on the page and add some later.

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  3. This is a wonderful resource. You should offer the whole set to one of the historical groups as a part of their record.

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  4. The entire set of pictures is archived with the Jamaica Plain Historical Society, and can be seen at their web site. The link is in the text above.

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  5. fascinating
    great cumulative effect

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  6. I know most of these houses.. several on my street are displayed.

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  7. These are great. I've been in many and my curiosity about some of them has been piqued over the years. My own home is an 1865 Mansard over by the Brewery. This neighborhood must have been one huge construction site for about 30 years! Nothing but the din of hammers.

    www.thebostonhometeam.com

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  8. hi, i used to live as a student when i was learnig english in 253 lamartine st with marge and david 17 years ago. any of you know them??? great times!!!! javinayra@msn.com

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  9. Great post!

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  10. Just came across this. Love the pictures. The one of 233 Chestnut Ave is where my mother grew up. Great to see it so well taken care of.

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  11. This is fabulous! It has so many of my fave JP houses in it. There's one house that's intrigued me for a while now, and other places list it as built in 1900 which sounded strange to me since it's on the old Prov Turnpike and looks like it could have been a boardinghouse house or inn or something from very long ago. I don't know, but here you list it as ca 1796 which is much more what I'd expected How did you find the year?

    Great photo essay!

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  12. There was a historical survey done back in the late 1980s, I believe. I got the dates from them. That was the Winchester farm house.

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  13. Thank you, Mark B! Do you have a citation for the survey?

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  14. Try this; http://mhc-macris.net/

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  15. Thanks so much, Mark. To every Boston history buff, I highly recommend 'Clark's Blue Book' of 1900, which lists the blue-blood (hence the term) residents of many, many addresses, including in JP. There you can learn that Dr. and Mrs. Jameson lived with their son Herbert at 28 Eliot St., for instance. Even better, the e-book is free: https://archive.org/details/clarksbostonblue1881bost

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